Spring navigation over
CSRgov
Indhold start
Top billede

Textile and Fashion

Danish textile and fashion companies are among the world leaders when it comes to improving the work environment and introducing environmental management, resource economy and cleaner technologies.

They were also among the first to use eco labels on their products, and they remain among the pioneers within ecology, Fair Trade and Cradle to Cradle solutions.

Companies that have set up factories around the world have continued to apply the high Danish CSR standards and are thus raising the bar for how local companies can produce more responsibly while operating a profitable business.
Danish textile and fashion companies are among the world leaders when it comes to improving the work environment and introducing environmental management, resource economy and cleaner technologies. They were also among the first to use eco labels on their products, and they remain among the pioneers within ecology, Fair Trade and Cradle to Cradle solutions. Companies that have set up factories around the world have continued to apply the high Danish CSR standards and are thus raising the bar for how local companies can produce more responsibly while operating a profitable business.

The textile industry employs around 6,000 people in Denmark and is characterised by a couple of very strong brands, especially within the furniture and carpet industry. In addition, the industry consists of many small and medium-sized companies specialising in niche productions. The fashion industry primarily consists of small and medium-sized companies and employs around 10,000 people. Brands in which quality and aesthetics go hand in hand with corporate social responsibility are often found among new trend-setting companies.

Almost all companies in the Danish textile and fashion industry work closely with their foreign suppliers to implement corporate social responsibility in production. The Danish Fashion and Textile trade organisation and the Danish Fashion Institute network organisation have supported the companies by developing the world's first industry-specific Code of Conduct based on the principles set out in the UN Global Compact, which also recommends that this set of rules be applied by textile/fashion manufacturers around the world. The Code has been further developed by the Danish Fashion Institute to become UN Global Compact's first official sector specific initiative, adding six new fashion and textile specific principles.

In addition, many Danish companies have chosen to become certified and have their suppliers certified according to schemes such as SA8000, BSCI (Business Social Compliance Initiative) or other internationally recognised standards.

World view on CSR and textiles

The fashion and textile industry is regarded as one of the most polluting industries, only surpassed by the steel industry, chemical companies and tanneries. The growing of cotton, bleaching and colouring of fibres as well as the production of the finished textiles are associated with a very high energy consumption and large amounts of wastewater and other forms of waste, imposing a considerable load on both the local and the global environments. Serious health and safety issues also plague the entire supply chain in connection with the handling of chemicals and chemical sprays, dust, noise and monotonous, repetitive work.

The fashion and textile industry is one of the most labour-intensive industries, and with production based in countries with low wages and no employee rights or opportunities for negotiation it becomes a challenge to create decent and responsible working conditions.